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Top Five Ways in which Dads are Different: Having Fun

Paul Banas
Author Paul Banas
Submitted 05-11-2007

Moms teach kids to stick to a routine while dads inspire
them to be more flexible. Goofing off seems to come easier to dads. Watching
dad feel free enough to be wacky, without concentrating on schedules or on how
long it takes food to cook, can be a valuable lesson for kids. Moms still bear
most of the burden for making sure the house is clean, dinner is on the table,
and the kids are on schedule. Dads teach kids to take life less seriously and
have some serious fun.

Dads are different in the way they nurture and express their
affection, and kids love it. For example, a dad may play in a puddle with his
kids—it’s his way of telling his kids that he enjoys their kind of fun because
he loves them.

What do dads often do with kids different from mom? They go
outside and play ball, build a model or some furniture, repair a car, play a
computer game, wrestle around on the floor, and help kids find creative
approaches to tackle their homework. All of these activities, if done with
compassion and respect, build a child’s self-confidence.



Note:
Navigate through the following links to read the entire article.



Top Five Ways in which Dads are Different: Introduction

Top Five Ways in which Dads are Different: Handling Emotions

Top Five Ways in which Dads are Different: Inspiring Self-Confidence

Top Five Ways in which Dads are Different: Handling Responsibility

Top Five Ways in which Dads are Different: Disciplining Kids

Top Five Ways in which Dads are Different: Having Fun

Top Five Ways in which Dads are Different: Conclusion

1 comments
Jason
Jason

I'm not really sure what the point of this article is, beyond simply going through several broad stereotypes about the differences between men and women. Of course a child needs both a mom and a dad, and those two parents are going to bring a different mindset and approach to raiding their child. Those different experiences and mindsets are very important to the child and I don't think you'll find many people arguing that. However, this article was filled with way too many really generic statements like "Dads inspire and challenge kids to take on responsibilities and to take responsibility for failure, if any. Dads also teach their kids how to handle money. While schools may teach children how to count, it is left to the dad to help their kids to take responsibility for their finances. " Why is that a dads role rather than mom? Are women not capable of managing the finances? Or taking responsibility for their actions? The differences between what a child learns from mom and dad will depend a lot on that mother and father, on their respective personalities and attitudes. I was genuinely interested in this article based on the title, but was disappointed to see it strewn with generic stereotypes and very broad, almost insulting, assumptions.