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About Diep Nguyen MD

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Kick Counting: How should I Count the Kicks?

  • If your healthcare provider has determined your pregnancy to be high-risk, start kick counting at 24 weeks. Otherwise, begin at 28 weeks.
  • Do kick counting about the same time each day during the time period when your baby is usually active.
  • Get in a comfortable sitting or lying position. Relax and dedicate this time to feel your baby’s precious movements.
  • You may want to rest your or your partner’s hands on your abdomen to better feel the movements. Your ability to feel the baby depends on the thickness of your abdominal wall, placental location and your sensitivity to the movements.
  • Jot down the time of the baby’s first movement and the time of the 10th movement. Most babies take less than 15 minutes.
  • If your baby moves less than usual or has less than ten movements in two hours, arouse your baby by drinking fluid or by walking for a few minutes and repeat the kick counting session.
  • Contact your provider or the labor and delivery if there is still decreased fetal movement or if there is a significant change in your baby’s usual activity or if your baby takes longer than two hours for ten movements. DO NOT WAIT.
  • If you have been evaluated for decreased fetal movement and sent home, make sure to follow up with your provider within a week.

 – Diep Nguyen MD

 

Diep Nguyen MD, a Los Angeles-based obstetrician, is the founder of www.babykick.com and www.babykickalliance.org.

 

Also read:


What Kick Counting Can Tell You about the Health of Your Baby

Kick Counting: Optimizing the Chance of Delivering a Healthy Baby

Kick Counting: Optimizing the Chance of Delivering a Healthy Baby

Kick counting is much more than just knowing that your baby moves. Kick counting can be a bonding time for both you and your partner, as together you can proactively protect your baby. It is best to systematically record daily kick counting to learn about your baby’s baseline movement rather than rely on memory recall. Your familiarity with your baby’s movements helps identify changes that may indicate potential pregnancy problems, which can allow your provider to institute timely intervention.

The goal of kick counting is not to make you anxious, but to have it be part of your daily prenatal care to screen for your baby’s well-being. By being aware of the baby’s movement patterns, you are empowered by working together with your medical team to reduce the risk of pregnancy complications, including preterm birth and stillbirth, and to ensure a safe pregnancy and a healthy baby.

 

– Diep Nguyen MD

 

Diep Nguyen MD, a Los Angeles-based obstetrician, is the founder of http://www.babykick.com%20and/ www.babykickalliance.org.

 

Also read:


What Kick Counting Can Tell You about the Health of Your Baby

Kick Counting: How should I Count the Kicks?

 

What Kick Counting Can Tell You about the Health of Your Baby

Kick counting is the daily systematic recording of a mom’s perception of her baby’s movement during the third trimester and is a reliable, simple and effective way to monitor a baby’s well-being. Kick counting can document changes in the fetal movement pattern and can help moms-to-be notify their healthcare provider of potential problems.

Fetal movement is an important sign of a baby’s health. Studies have shown that decreased fetal movements are associated with pregnancy complications, including growth problems, preterm birth and stillbirth. The use of kick count charts help decrease the risk of stillbirth by reducing the delay in intervention.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that expectant mothers note the time it takes for their baby to complete ten movements, at approximately the same time each day when the baby is usually most active. Movements include kicks, turns, twists, swishes, jabs and rolls, but exclude hiccups. The understanding that babies have sleep cycles, when they are less active, can alleviate anxieties associated with kick counting.

In general, healthy babies should complete ten movements within two hours and most babies achieve ten movements in less than 15 minutes. Moms should alert their healthcare provider immediately if the baby’s normal pattern changes or if the baby takes more than two hours to complete ten movements.

 – Diep Nguyen MD

Diep Nguyen MD, a Los Angeles-based obstetrician, is the founder of www.babykick.com and www.babykickalliance.org.

 

Also read:


Kick Counting: How should I Count the Kicks?

Kick Counting: Optimizing the Chance of Delivering a Healthy Baby