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Good news on preventing kids’ allergies during pregnancy

Paul Banas
Author Paul Banas
Submitted 07-01-2008

In the New York Times today, an article report that the American Academy of Pediatrics no longer will will advise new moms to avoid milk, eggs, fish, peanuts and tree nuts while breast feeding. Of course, this makes it harder to know what you really should do, but at least it’s one less thing for moms to feel guilty about.

The report says:

–There is no convincing evidence that women who avoid peanuts or other foods during pregnancy or breast-feeding lower their child’s risk of allergies.

–For infants with a family history of allergies, exclusive breast-feeding for at least four months can lessen the risk of rashes and allergy to cow’s milk.

–Exclusive breast-feeding for at least three months protects against wheezing in babies, but whether it prevents asthma in older children is unclear.

–There is modest evidence for feeding hypoallergenic formulas to susceptible babies if they are not solely breast-fed.

–There is no good evidence that soy-based formulas prevent allergies.

–There is no convincing evidence that delaying the introduction of foods such as eggs, fish or peanut butter to children prevents allergies. Babies should not get solid food before 4 to 6 months of age, however.