Welcome Back!

User Name
Password
Not Registered?

Tell us a little about yourself.

My child’s birthday is (for newsletter customization):

Enter an email address:

This is where your newsletters will be delivered to and where GreatDad.com will contact you with your new account information.

father's forum

A place to discuss, learn and share ideas, thoughts and solutions.
Latest Posts

How Fathers can help in Br...
Posts: 1 Views: 338

Hi everyone
Posts: 1 Views: 634

Gifts for Father's Da...
Posts: 18 Views: 2282

Which camera to choose?
Posts: 1 Views: 1024

SEEKING FUN-FRESH CONTESTA...
Posts: 1 Views: 1123

hi mom!

Would you like to share this site with your husband or a friend?

Just enter his email address and your name below and we'll let him know all about GreatDad.com.

His email address
Your Name

Dads use parenting skills to promote positive behavior

Author Alex Bellamy
Submitted 05-05-2009

One of the hardest parenting skill a father must develop may be how to discipline his child when they act out or engage in improper behavior.
Though difficult, it is also a crucial point in the child’s development, as the wrong action can have adverse affects in the future.

Fathers who are more sports-oriented may want to draw a metaphor between good behaviors and how a winning professional team works together for a common goal. This may also help the child learn about disciplinary actions, especially when you call such actions a penalty or a foul.

This approach can help build consistency with the child so that they understand to avoid certain behaviors. Fathers who are inconsistent in this element of parenting run the risk of confusing their children as to which behaviors are acceptable and which are not.

Another action most fathers warn against is bribery, as in promising something to their child if they do present good or positive behavior. This can be especially confusing if a child acts out first and is then told they will receive a reward for changing their behavior. Though it may be subtle, it is in fact telling a child if they act out first, they will be rewarded.ADNFCR-1662-ID-19152106-ADNFCR