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Wordlock: Combination lock works with letters

Paul Banas
Author Paul Banas
Submitted 22-04-2011

Have you had to have security come and saw off your lock at the gym because you forgot the combo? Have you thrown away old Master locks you’ve found in a drawer because no one remembers 3-24-12? I’ve done both and I’m just waiting for this to happen to my kids. I wasn’t a slow child, but I remember being completely frustrated getting a turn right/turn left combination lock to consistently open, especially with only five minutes between classes.

I was just sent samples of Wordlock, a new tough lock that uses letters, not numbers to set combinations. I can’t judge for it’s overall security, but I would bet it’s enough to thwart high school students and gym rats. The locks are very simple: you set them on a four or five letter combination using the type of dial keypad you often see on luggage or a briefcase (and not the R-L-R turning system). It’s very easy to reset the combination to familiar words. However, you are limited to ten letters for each set. In my case, I was able to choose “PAULS” for the five-letter combo, but couldn’t not choose “PAULB” because there was no B in position 5. (Attention thieves who now think they have my password – I’m not that stupid).

Wordlock Resettable Cable Lock

The locks come in simple (and cheaper) versions for school use, as well as more expensive cable bike locks (pictured here) and big and tough brass models that are marked “ideal for boats and all weather environments.” I did not put them in the freezer or bathtub to check this out.

In a funny sidelight, Wordlock also hosts a list of four and five letter words on their site www.wordlock.com, so even if you don’t buy the lock, it might help you in scrabble.

These would make good gifts for father’s day, mom’s day, or even for graduation for kids venturing into new unsafe waters.

GreatDad.com Review Policy: The featured product for this review was provided to us, at no cost, by the manufacturer or representing PR agency for the sole purpose of product testing. We do not accept monetary compensation for reviewing or writing about products. We only review products that we have personally tested and used in our own homes, and all opinions expressed are our own.

Have you had to have security come and saw off your lock at the gym because you forgot the combo? Have you thrown away old Master locks you’ve found in a drawer because no one remembers 3-24-12? I’ve done both and I’m just waiting for this to happen to my kids. I wasn’t a slow child, but I remember being completely frustrated getting a turn right/turn left combination lock to consistently open, especially with only five minutes between classes.

I was just sent samples of Wordlock, a new tough lock that uses letters, not numbers to set combinations. I can’t judge for it’s overall security, but I would bet it’s enough to thwart high school students and gym rats.