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That’s being clumsy

Paul Banas
Author Paul Banas
Submitted 10-01-2007

Because toddlers at this age are actually learning to control the use of their bodies, they might appear to us to be quite clumsy. In reality though, all the stumbling, tripping, and falling over is what helps them master their movements quickly.
 
It is normal for your toddler to bump into something by mistake, fall down a few times, or drop things now and-then. However, if you sense that behavior is not normal or is getting worse,  you may need to seek professional help.

Here are signs to tell you that your toddler needs help:


  • If the your toddler’s attempts show no sign of improving with time.

  • If your toddler’s behavior deteriorates in terms of movement over a period of time.

  • If your toddler develops new symptoms relating to failure of motion and movement.
Here are steps you can take in the right direction:


  • If your toddler misses large objects such as chairs or cots, it may be a problem with your toddler’s eyesight. In such a case, you should consult a qualified optometrist.

  • If your toddler keeps falling down or dropping things very often, it may be due to a neurological disorder, a degenerative disorder, or a progressive disorder. In such a case, you should consult your pediatrician.