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Hit the books! 3 tips to boost your kid’s studying habits

Paul Banas
Author Paul Banas
Submitted 12-08-2013

The summer is winding down, and for kids across the country, that can only mean one thing: Time to start hitting the books.

Heading back to school after a summer filled with fun is never easy, but some children can really struggle when it comes to studying, especially for difficult topics. With these three helpful tips, you can get your kid in great shape academically for the upcoming year.

1. Study together
If you've noticed that your son or daughter is really struggling in classes, why not try to engage him or her on another level by studying together? With a little planning, you can devote several nights a week to helping your kid get ahead in the classroom, while also building lasting memories together.

2. Turn off the TV
Nothing is more distracting than having a television on in the background as you try to encourage your son or daughter to get studying. Be sure to keep TVs, as well as other distracting electronic devices, out of your child's homework and studying areas.

3. Don't stress about the small stuff
While it's important that your son or daughter does well in school, you want to watch out for signs that your kid may be stressing out too much over his or her grades.

If your end goal during fatherhood is raising a well-adjusted child who can think critically about the world and has a healthy curiosity in a range of academic topics, emphasizing a perfect report card may not be your top priority. It may serve your son or daughter better in the long run, too.