Welcome Back!

User Name
Password
Not Registered?

Tell us a little about yourself.

My child’s birthday is (for newsletter customization):

Enter an email address:

This is where your newsletters will be delivered to and where GreatDad.com will contact you with your new account information.

father's forum

A place to discuss, learn and share ideas, thoughts and solutions.
Latest Posts

Nike shose
Posts: 2 Views: 39

Copiare borse omega
Posts: 2 Views: 37

Moncler Stivali
Posts: 1 Views: 31

Scarpe Burberry Mens
Posts: 3 Views: 33

Presa di pandora
Posts: 2 Views: 29

hi mom!

Would you like to share this site with your husband or a friend?

Just enter his email address and your name below and we'll let him know all about GreatDad.com.

His email address
Your Name

Emergency Contraception – What are the types of emergency contraception?

Paul Banas
Author Paul Banas
Submitted 04-12-2006

What are the types of emergency contraception?


 


There are two types:



  • Emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs)
  • Intrauterine devices (IUDs)

According to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, ECPs contain higher doses of the same hormones in some brands of regular birth control pills. Some ECPs are “combined ECPS” with progestin and estrogen. Others are progestin-only. If your spouse is breastfeeding or if she can’t take estrogen, she should use Progestin-only ECPs. She should always take ECPs as soon as she can after having sex, but they can work up to five days later.


 


There are two types of ECPs:



  • Plan B (progestin-only) – made for use as emergency contraception. The two pills can be taken in two doses (one pill right away, and the next pill 12 hours later), or both pills can be taken at the same time. Some women feel sick and throw up after taking ECPs. Taking both pills at the same time will not increase your spouse’s chances of having these side effects. If she throws up after taking ECPs, call the doctor or pharmacist.
  • Higher dose of regular birth control pills – The number of pills in a dose is different for each pill brand, and not all brands can be used for emergency contraception. For more information on birth control pills that can be used for emergency contraception, visit Not-2-Late.com. The pills are taken in two doses (one dose right away, and the next dose 12 hours later). Make sure your spouse always uses the same brand for both doses. Some women feel sick and throw up after taking ECPs. If she throws up after taking ECPs, call your doctor or pharmacist.

The other type of emergency contraception is the IUD. The IUD is a T-shaped, plastic device placed into the uterus (womb) by a doctor within five days after having sex.


 


The IUD works by:



  • Keeping the sperm from meeting the egg

OR



  • Keeping the egg from attaching to the uterus (womb)

According to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, ECPs contain higher doses of the same hormones in some brands of regular birth control pills, your doctor can remove the IUD after your spouse’s next period. Or, it can be left in place for up to 10 years to use as her regular birth control.


 


Also See:


 


·       Is emergency contraception the same thing as the “abortion pill?”


·       How will my spouse get emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs)?


·       Can my spouse get emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) before she needs them?


·       Will ECPs protect my spouse from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)?


·       What does my spouse need to do after she takes emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs)?


·       Does emergency contraception work all the time?


·       Will it harm the baby if my spouse took emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) that did not work?


·       What is emergency contraception (or emergency birth control)?


0 comments