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5 tips to stop the whining

Author John Thompson
Submitted 08-07-2010

As fathers, we’re all united in one simple fact: whining can grate on your nerves unlike anything else. Even the best, most attentive parents have whiny kids, at least some of the time.

Experts say kids use the high-pitched, nasally tone parents call whining to get attention and get what they want.

"Whining gets the parent’s attention," pediatrician Dr. Laurel Schultz told WebMD. "A high-pitched whine is effective because a parent can’t not attend to it."

While some dads may give in to their kids’ whining simply to make it stop, there are a few parenting advice tips to put an end to it for good:

1. Whine back. By responding to whining by whining yourself, your kids will realize how it silly it sounds.

2. Tell them you don’t understand what they’re saying. Ask them (calmly!) to use a normal voice to get what they want and only respond when they do.

3. Ignore them. This may cause the whining to continue for a few minutes longer, but it will also send the message that you will not acknowledge whining.

4. Avoid a negative reaction. Showing them how much the whining annoys you won’t make it stop any quicker. Instead, try something like talking in a calm voice or covering your ears with a smile on your face to bring their attention to the problem.

5. Don’t give in. While it’s tempting to give your child what he or she wants, doing so will only enforce the belief that whining works.

Remember that change doesn’t happen overnight and being consistent is key to changing your child’s behavior.
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