Welcome Back!

User Name
Password
Not Registered?

Tell us a little about yourself.

My child’s birthday is (for newsletter customization):

Enter an email address:

This is where your newsletters will be delivered to and where GreatDad.com will contact you with your new account information.

father's forum

A place to discuss, learn and share ideas, thoughts and solutions.
Latest Posts

Hi everyone
Posts: 1 Views: 374

Gifts for Father's Da...
Posts: 18 Views: 1566

Which camera to choose?
Posts: 1 Views: 758

SEEKING FUN-FRESH CONTESTA...
Posts: 1 Views: 791

Calendar Reminder for 2018
Posts: 1 Views: 1712

hi mom!

Would you like to share this site with your husband or a friend?

Just enter his email address and your name below and we'll let him know all about GreatDad.com.

His email address
Your Name

Complications – Some Pregnancy Problems without Symptoms

Author GreatDad Writers
Submitted 15-01-2007

Some Pregnancy Problems without Symptoms Some health problems your spouse may have during pregnancy do not have warning signs. According to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, one of these is Group B Streptococcus (GBS) infection. GBS is a common infection that rarely makes adults sick. The bacterium lives in the gastrointestinal system, along with many other harmless bacteria.


 


According to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, between 10 to 30 percent of pregnant women carry GBS in their vagina and rectums. But, if GBS is passed to the baby during delivery, it can cause serious health problems in the newborn, such as pneumonia, blood infection, or infection of the tissues around the brain.


 


Because there are no symptoms of GBS, she will be tested at 35 to 37 weeks of pregnancy. The simple test involves swabbing the vagina and rectum for a sample of cells that are sent to a lab to look for GBS. If she is infected, she will be treated with intravenous (IV) antibiotics during labor and delivery to make sure the baby is protected.


 


Another problem is anemia, or having below-normal levels of iron in the blood. Iron is needed for hemoglobin (a protein in blood that helps take oxygen to body tissues for energy and growth) for your spouse and your baby. Iron also helps build bones and teeth. Most women do not have any symptoms of anemia. For those who do, extreme fatigue is often the only sign. Your doctor will check for signs of anemia using routine blood tests during different stages of the pregnancy. If your spouse has anemia, she will be given iron supplements.


 


According to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, you can help her prevent anemia by getting her to eat lots of iron-rich foods like lean red meat, potatoes with skins, raisins, broccoli, leafy green vegetables, whole-grain breads and iron-fortified cereals.


 


Also See: