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Bill Cosby weighs in on fatherhood once again

Author John Thompson
Submitted 11-12-2008

Today’s fathers may remember admiring Bill Cosby’s TV parenting skills on The Cosby Show or chuckling at the amusing tales in his bestselling book Fatherhood.

This week, the legendary comedian returned to his favorite topic, speaking with lawmakers in Hartford, Connecticut about absent fathers and their effect on children’s lives.

Cosby appeared before the state Capitol’s Fatherhood Task Force to dole out parenting advice and express concern that "fatherlessness is taking its toll on too many young people and families," the Connecticut Post reports.

"No one can legislate the ideal parent, but we too know – however – that engaged parents create structure and their influence is critical to every young person," the actor said.

In recent years, Cosby has backed away from the entertainment industry and focused his efforts towards children and families, earning a doctorate in education.

Some of his comments – particularly those criticizing rap music, hip-hop culture and absent fathers – have attracted controversy.

In 2004, he gave a speech which called on the black community to come together to solve problems such as the growing high school drop-out rate and literacy gaps.
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